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    Glasgow: A Sense Of Place in Scottish Crime Fiction

    What a great tour into Sue Walker’s literary work you just guided us through Mairiuna!

    It is so interesting that I will continue on the same path for a while and explore how the unique atmosphere of a particular place provides inspiration to an author. And come to think of it, to capture such “sense of place” is a great way to export cities and places unto the literary map.

    Now that we covered Edinburgh in the last posts, what about Glasgow ? As much as Edinburgh, the city should be able to acclaim it’s own “sense of place” under the pen of many crime novels writers.

    As I did for Edinburgh, I started my quest by researching crime fiction novelists born in Glasgow and having chosen Glasgow as the setting to their plots.

    First, I went down the list of the 52 Crime Novels set in Glasgow on BooksFromScotland website and from these 52 novels, I drilled down a list of Glasgow’s natives.

    They are:

    - Denise Mina

    - Caro Ramsay

    - Alex Gray

    - Campbell Armstrong

    - Christopher Brookmyre

    - Hugh Collins

    Did I miss anyone ? Kindly let me know if the case may be.

    Scottish crime fiction author Denise Mina, while being interviewed by Stephanie Padilla of the New Mystery Reader, said about  ” a sense of place ” :

    S.P. : Your previous 4 novels, as this one, take place in Glasgow. You paint a dark and gritty picture of this city so vibrantly that it feels as if it’s a character in itself, but it also seems to be infused with a love-hate type of vibe, so which is it, really?

    Denise Mina-Scottish Crime Fiction Author

    Denise Mina-Scottish Crime Fiction Author

    D.M. : Glasgow is hard going. I love it here and find it a very honest city, I share a lot of its values and love that people talk to each other and enjoy fighting. It’s very like New York in fact. I remember a carton about New York and LA. In the LA one the person say ‘have a nice day’ but means ‘fuck you’. In the New York one the person says ‘fuck you’ but means ‘have a nice day’. Glaswegians are mad about courtesy but will shout at you in the street if you make the mistake of being a little rude to them. I keep setting books here because I think most cities are universal. They’re organic and many features of one city will in variably be true of any other. Except for restaurants and the quality of the coffee.


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    2 comments to Glasgow: A Sense Of Place in Scottish Crime Fiction

    • Are you sure about Brookmyre? I thought he was from Paisley. Why else would he support St Mirren?

      • Hi Darren! Not easy to find Brookmyre’s birthplace but we got our info at => http://www.contemporarywriters.com/authors/?p=auth02D4J064212627313 . If you find otherwise kindly let us know. As for supporting St-Mirren, why not even if he is from Glasgow? Mairiuna lives in Bordeaux, France, and suppports Scotland football team when they play against France :-) We visited your blogs with much interest and it reminded us that we wanted to talk about the great Scottish socialist, John MacLean. We learned about him at People’s Palace. Indeed there is much to discover in Glasgow. Best. Janice & Mairiuna.

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